The Seahawk

North Carolina Rep. Madison Cawthorn and Indiana Rep. Jim Banks chat before former U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo introduces the Maximum Pressure Act against Iran on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday, April 21, 2021.
OPINION: Madison Cawthorn should be doing more to help the disabled community
Michael Friant, Contributing Writer • August 5, 2021
Cawthorn should be using his platform to amplify that people with disabilities are in fact normal. He could do this in a variety of ways. First, he could talk about his own experiences as a person with a wheelchair. Undoubtedly, he has had these experiences and they have played a huge role in his life. Second, he could start weekly conversations with other people with disabilities in North Carolina which would not only amplify the disability community but also enlighten him as a representative of the people.
RA Benjamin Zumpe wearing a mask in Graham-Hewlett.
OPINION: New mask mandate returns us to an unnecessarily restricted existence
Jacob Sawyer, Staff Writer • August 3, 2021
Even as data show the pandemic to be largely over for the fully vaccinated, the fear-mongering ultimately won the war. On July 27, the CDC recommended that fully vaccinated Americans in roughly two-thirds of U.S. counties should return to covering their faces indoors. At this time, only public places are included, and private gatherings remain unaffected. This does not sound too bad, but the move is based on circumstantial evidence that ignores the overall big picture.
Democratic candidate Jeff Jackson is running for U.S. Senate.
Here are North Carolina's candidates running for the Senate in 2022
Brenna Flanagan , Editor-in-Chief • July 15, 2021

Since incumbent Senator Richard Burr announced he would not seek re-election in 2022, many North Carolinians have expressed interest...

Dr. Anthony Fauci during a House Select Subcommittee hearing on Thursday, April 15, 2021, on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.
OPINION: The government and mainstream media prevented us from addressing the lab-leak theory. There should be consequences.
Jacob Sawyer, Staff Writer • June 25, 2021
The leakage of COVID-19 from Wuhan’ institute has not yet been officially confirmed. It might never be, especially as the lab’s top officials, as well as their ultimate superiors in the Chinese Communist Party, continue to suppress the truth. But numerous signs, relating to both the virus itself and the suspicious politics surrounding it, have emerged in favor of the lab-leak hypothesis.
Palestinian protesters clash with Israeli security forces at the Hawara checkpoint south of Nablus city, in the occupied West Bank, on May 18, 2021. - Palestinians across the West Bank and in east Jerusalem and Arab districts in Israel were largely adhering to a general strike called in support of those under bombardment in Gaza, which led to violent clashes throughout the territories.
OPINION: The Gaza crisis shows that it’s time to stop glorifying your country at the expense of others
Jacob Sawyer, Staff Writer • May 29, 2021
This senseless violence is another example of patriotism taken way too far. Idolization of the state was a key driving force behind humanity’s bloodiest conflicts, including both World Wars. More recently, right-wing nationalist leaders like former U.S. President Donald Trump nearly caused a further war with policies like imposing universal sanctions on Iran and escalating economic tensions with China. Both moves were harmful to innocent civilians within their target countries and did not help the U.S. in any way.
Members of the Multi-faith Anti-Racism Change and Healing Group celebrate at 38th and Chicago after the verdict was read in the murder trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, Tuesday, April 20, 2021 in Minneapolis.
OPINION: The Chauvin conviction marks the end of the beginning, not the beginning of the end
Jacob Sawyer, Staff Writer • April 24, 2021
Derek Chauvin, the officer who killed Floyd, was found guilty of murder Tuesday and hauled off to prison, possibly for decades. The Black community and its allies joyously poured into America’s streets in celebration, relieved that they can now begin to heal from the trauma of both the killing and trial. Many consider the case a turning point in U.S. policing as well as the country overall, but much more and harder work remains ahead.
The U.S. Capitol Building, on Saturday, Jan. 16, 2021, in Washington, D.C. 

(Kent Nishimura/TNS)
OPINION: Who is the filibuster for?
Nicolas Ziccardi, Assistant Opinion Editor • April 22, 2021
While it is feasible to eliminate the filibuster as it exists now, many senators, including Manchin and other Democrats, are hesitant to destroy what they see as a key tool of the minority party. With Democrats' Senate and House prospects looking mixed going into the 2022 midterm elections, several Democratic senators are worried that Republicans would be able to do much more damage than they did during the Trump administration if the filibuster is removed. 
The Mohnin-Sholz LGBTQ office.
OPINION: For the LGBT community, an Arkansas bill sets a dangerous precedent nationwide
Jacob Sawyer, Staff Writer • April 20, 2021

In Arkansas, any transgender resident under the age of 18 is about to be denied the medical care required to help them transition genders. This...

Asylum-seekers who crossed the U.S.-Mexico border illegally wait to be processed in Mission, Texas.
OPINION: Who is really behind the border crisis? (Hint: it is not Biden or Trump)
Jacob Sawyer, Staff Writer • April 8, 2021
It is true that since Biden took office, the number of apprehensions of migrants entering the U.S. from the southern border surged after he promised in his campaign to enact more liberal immigration policies. It is also true that Trump’s directives were extremely controversial and sometimes in violation of human rights, which Biden harped on during his campaign. 
President Trump and his allies were livid when Twitter exercised its commercial prerogative and banned him.
OPINION: The end of Trump’s ‘fireside chats’
Anthony Culler, Contributing Writer • March 24, 2021
FDR, a Democrat, faced an adversarial force in the dominant press of the day—newspapers—the majority of which were conservative. This is in stark contrast to today’s press which most will agree is more left-leaning than the right-leaning newspapers of the 1930s. And while FDR had major resistance from the newspapers, he found solace in his radio broadcasts. You could consider it, in today’s terms, his very own social media venue. If you compare the use of Twitter by Trump during his presidency, you will see a similarity in FDR's use of radio.
President Joe Biden delivers remarks on the national economy in the State Dining Room at the White House on Feb. 5, 2021. The president’s first speech to Congress is generally an opportunity to lay out long-term policy themes as well as shorter-term legislative goals.
OPINION: Why politician's promises are not always kept, and why they make them anyway
Nicolas Ziccardi, Assistant Opinion Editor • March 2, 2021

Candidates make many promises before and during their time in office, and presidential candidates are certainly no exception. President Biden...

International newspaper & magazine, TIME magazine.
OPINION: Do we have freedom of speech in media?
Nicolas Ziccardi, Assistant Opinion Editor • February 23, 2021

Two of the most prominent facets of our government and our very existence are the Bill of Rights and First Amendment. Bandied about as the fabric...

U.S. President Donald Trump removes his mask upon return to the White House from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Oct. 5, 2020, in Washington, D.C. Trump spent three days hospitalized for coronavirus.
OPINION: Despite acquittal, Trump win in 2024 unlikely
Jacob Sawyer, Staff Writer • February 23, 2021

Former President Donald Trump must be held accountable for his actions. From spreading disinformation to grieving supporters following his re-election...

Democratic U.S. Senate candidates Jon Ossoff, right, and Raphael Warnock of Georgia wave to supporters during a rally on November 15, 2020, in Marietta, Georgia.
OPINION: We need youth in the government
Nicolas Ziccardi, Assistant Opinion Editor • February 18, 2021

At a judiciary committee hearing in 2018, Senate President Pro Tempore Orrin Hatch, the oldest member of the senate at the time, questioned Facebook...

Jeff Jackson at a rally.

Photo provided by Jeff Jacksons official press team
Jeff Jackson announces run for U.S. Senate
Nicolas Ziccardi, Staff Writer • January 31, 2021

On Jan. 26, Jeff Jackson, four-term North Carolina State Senator, announced he would be running for U.S. Senate to replace outgoing Senator Richard...

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Politics: Nation & World