The Seahawk

Chancellor Volety poses with Sammy C. Hawk at Wagoner Dining Hall.
Chancellor Aswani Volety on his vision for UNCW
Hannah Markov, Editor-in-Chief • September 13, 2022
As students settle back into life on campus, so does UNCW’s new Chancellor, Dr. Aswani Volety. On July 1, 2022, Dr. Volety returned to UNCW to serve as the university’s seventh Chancellor. Volety, who previously served in the role of Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and Executive Director of the Center for Marine Science, brings with him decades worth of education and research experience, particularly in the field of marine science.
Brianna Ogoke, Lauran Jones, Mylan Parker, Tierra Ripley are all staff member on the Seabreeze Magazine.
Lauran Jones on uplifting Black voices through literary magazine Seabreeze
Nitya Budamagunta, Staff Writer • May 11, 2022
Seabreeze: A Literary Diaspora celebrated the release of its second issue on Feb. 23, with its first issue published the previous year. With two issues and a full staff, Seabreeze joins the ranks of UNCW’s creative magazines. The publication was founded in 2019 by graduating student Lauran Jones. A literary arts enthusiast who was looking to increase diversity in the arts on campus, Jones leaves a legacy in Seabreeze.
Courtesy of Nina de Gramont.
Professor Nina de Gramont on her instant bestseller ‘The Christie Affair'
Abigail Celoria, Culture Editor • March 28, 2022
Less than three weeks after the novel’s publication, “The Christie Affair” claimed the number five spot on the New York Times’ best seller list of hardcover fiction. Reese’s Book Club selected it as their pick for February, which, along with an effective marketing campaign, elevated the book’s buzz upon release. The Seahawk selected it for our February pick as well, not only for its incredible mystery, but the author behind it. A professor with UNCW’s own creative writing department, Nina de Gramont’s latest book became an overnight success. This is made sweeter by her dedication to the novel throughout its lengthy writing process.
Malala Yousafzai, advocate for womens education and Florence Nightingale, who developed modern nursing in Randalls Womens History Month Exhibit.
Randall Library celebrates Women’s History Month with ‘Women Who Changed the World' exhibit
Emma Smith, Staff Writer • March 23, 2022
The ‘Women Who Changed the World” exhibition is currently on display on the second floor of the William Madison Randall Library in honor of Women’s History Month. This curated collection of original artwork by the library’s graphic designer, John Crawford, advocates for the celebration of legendary female prominence. A Supreme Court Justice, a passionate feminist, a former First Lady and activist, a breakthrough chemist and a Nobel Peace Prize laureate, among others, decorate the walls of Randall, inspiring students, staff and visitors for the month of March. 
Director, Writer and Produce Deepak Rauniyar from Nepal.
Professor Deepak Rauniyar on short film ‘Four Nights’ showing at the Berlin International Film Festival
Abigail Celoria, Assistant Culture Editor • February 17, 2022
Rauniyar’s career in film is built on a life-long pursuit. Through first visits to the theatre in his teenage years, he became interested in film as a means of expression. “I grew up in a society that was very racist,” said Rauniyar. “At the time, Nepal was run by a lighter skinned group. At my school, I was alone; I didn’t speak the local language; my classmates and teachers would bully me. I found that even in local films, lighter skinned actors would wear blackface to portray us on screen. No one like me was making these films. I wanted to change that.”
Students on Chancellors Walk on their way to class
UNCW hosts most sustainable Homecoming in university’s history
Caroline Straubel, Culture Editor • February 11, 2022
UNCW’s Homecoming week of Feb. 7 to 13, 2022 is the most sustainable in the university’s history. This year’s homecoming features green initiatives with solar panel phone charging stations, solar umbrellas, composting bins at events and rain gardens to promote a more environmentally conscious campus.
The Schoolboys.
UNCW professors share their experiences in band 'The Schoolboys'
Giancarlo Franzese, Contributing Writer • February 3, 2022
When it comes down to talent here at UNCW, The Schoolboys is one to consider, as this band continues to amaze both on and off campus. Members of the band including UNCW professors James Hunt, Rick Olsen and Bill Bolduc share their experiences, each having an important role as a member of the Schoolboys. Olsen, chair of the communication studies department, is in charge of vocals, harmonica and the keyboard. Olsen’s main responsibility involves singing lots of lead vocals for the band’s catalog while Bolduc covers guitar and back-up vocals. Hunt’s role is to provide the beat and vocals for The Schoolboys. 
Daomi poses on the streets of South Korea.
Tales From Abroad: From South Korea to the States
Giancarlo Franzese, Contributing Writer • November 19, 2021
Kim’s travels abroad have helped her create some helpful advice for any college student wanting to travel or study abroad. According to Kim, a student must always carry an open mind, be open to explore new things in life and be willing to broaden their horizons. “One can never be too creative if you are stuck in your bubble surrounded by the same thing day in and day out,” said Kim.
Cucalorus airs a secret screening on November 14th.
REVIEW: Cucalorus finishes up with ‘After Blue,’ a French throwback to ‘80s sci-fi fantasy films
Boyce Rucker, Intern • November 16, 2021
The premise of the film is intriguing and feels new, but the narrative is incoherent and lacks depth. As previously mentioned, aesthetics, world-building and production design are the film’s strong points. But for these elements to be effective, the film needs a deeper narrative to be able to convey these ideas and lend itself to a deeper meaning. The characters are not well-developed either, it seems like they are objects meant to simply advance the film, rather than fleshed out characters we can root for and relate to. Roxy could be an interesting character, but there is no easy way for us to connect with her character, or recognize any development for her beyond sexual desires.
Katia Pascariu in “Bad Luck Banging or Loony Porn” (2021).
REVIEW: Cucalorus presents a graphic display of Romanian scandal in ‘Bad Luck Banging or Loony Porn’
Boyce Rucker, Intern • November 15, 2021
“Bad Luck Banging or Loony Porn” strays from what we would expect from Western cinema to deliver a social critique of human apathy. Its themes and aesthetics are effective and present a larger universal theme about the disconnect in human empathy. After watching it, there is no mystery to why it was selected as the Romanian entry for the Best International Feature Film at the 94th Academy Awards.
Zelda Adams in “Hellbender” (2021).
REVIEW: 'Hellbender' is a mystifying film about turning your back on heaven
Grace Hall, Contributing Writer • November 15, 2021
The overarching narrative of family, the relationship between mother and daughter, the cycle of nature and life and the power of death, fear and otherness leave lots to think about among viewers. The Adams’ family’s relationship dynamic plays out within the movie, making it all the more memorable.
A still from Theirs Is the Kingdom (2021).
REVIEW: Cucalorus documentary ‘Theirs is the Kingdom’ paints an Asheville community in divine image
Brenna Flanagan, Editor-in-Chief • November 14, 2021
In justifying the mural, the film and its subjects examine who gets to benefit from art and who gets to be represented in art. It questions the often-elitist notion of art as luxury and instead suggests that art is crucial for misunderstood or underrepresented communities. It is necessary that they feel seen, and in a world that often chooses to look away from those standing on street corners, art can represent people as humans worthy of being admired. The audience takes home a much deeper lesson on the intersection between art, religion and humanity.
A still from “The Oxy Kingpins” (2021).
REVIEW: 'The Oxy Kingpins' mainlines a shot of reality to Cucalorus 2021
Niko Giammanco, Contributing Writer • November 13, 2021
Like a “sit-down” between Big Pharma and “The Godfather,” “The Oxy Kingpins,” a documentary directed by Brendan Fitzgerald (also known for Gaycation) and Nick August-Perna (also known for The Swell Season), delivers an in-your-face take on the hypocrisy of capitalism and its ability to skirt justice for the sake of money, causing the intentional pain of millions of addicted Americans, with no hint of remorse insight.
Katie Boland in “We’re All in This Together” (2021).
REVIEW: ‘We’re All In This Together’ is a remarkable dysfunctional family film
Stephen Lambros, Contributing Writer • November 13, 2021
“We’re All In This Together” signals a promising future for star and filmmaker Boland. With this captivating film, Boland can surely harness her vision for characters and story to move forward in the industry as an actress and a director. All in all, “We’re All In This Together” tells a chaotic, humorous, and earnest tale of the mending of familial bonds and the unyielding devotion coming along beside it.
A still from “Wuhan Wuhan” (2021).
REVIEW: ‘Wuhan Wuhan’ explores a new perspective of the COVID-19 pandemic
Stephen Lambros, Contributing Writer • November 13, 2021
All in all, “Wuhan Wuhan” is a heartfelt and deeply human time capsule that deserves to be seen by many people. The film effectively shows that while the coronavirus affected people on a global scale, the human race is more than capable of overcoming it.

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