The Seahawk

Daomi poses on the streets of South Korea.
Tales From Abroad: From South Korea to the States
Giancarlo Franzese, Contributing Writer • November 18, 2021
Kim’s travels abroad have helped her create some helpful advice for any college student wanting to travel or study abroad. According to Kim, a student must always carry an open mind, be open to explore new things in life and be willing to broaden their horizons. “One can never be too creative if you are stuck in your bubble surrounded by the same thing day in and day out,” said Kim.
Cucalorus airs a secret screening on November 14th.
REVIEW: Cucalorus finishes up with ‘After Blue,’ a French throwback to ‘80s sci-fi fantasy films
Boyce Rucker, Intern • November 16, 2021
The premise of the film is intriguing and feels new, but the narrative is incoherent and lacks depth. As previously mentioned, aesthetics, world-building and production design are the film’s strong points. But for these elements to be effective, the film needs a deeper narrative to be able to convey these ideas and lend itself to a deeper meaning. The characters are not well-developed either, it seems like they are objects meant to simply advance the film, rather than fleshed out characters we can root for and relate to. Roxy could be an interesting character, but there is no easy way for us to connect with her character, or recognize any development for her beyond sexual desires.
Katia Pascariu in “Bad Luck Banging or Loony Porn” (2021).
REVIEW: Cucalorus presents a graphic display of Romanian scandal in ‘Bad Luck Banging or Loony Porn’
Boyce Rucker, Intern • November 15, 2021
“Bad Luck Banging or Loony Porn” strays from what we would expect from Western cinema to deliver a social critique of human apathy. Its themes and aesthetics are effective and present a larger universal theme about the disconnect in human empathy. After watching it, there is no mystery to why it was selected as the Romanian entry for the Best International Feature Film at the 94th Academy Awards.
Zelda Adams in “Hellbender” (2021).
REVIEW: 'Hellbender' is a mystifying film about turning your back on heaven
Grace Hall, Contributing Writer • November 15, 2021
The overarching narrative of family, the relationship between mother and daughter, the cycle of nature and life and the power of death, fear and otherness leave lots to think about among viewers. The Adams’ family’s relationship dynamic plays out within the movie, making it all the more memorable.
A still from Theirs Is the Kingdom (2021).
REVIEW: Cucalorus documentary ‘Theirs is the Kingdom’ paints an Asheville community in divine image
Brenna Flanagan, Editor-in-Chief • November 14, 2021
In justifying the mural, the film and its subjects examine who gets to benefit from art and who gets to be represented in art. It questions the often-elitist notion of art as luxury and instead suggests that art is crucial for misunderstood or underrepresented communities. It is necessary that they feel seen, and in a world that often chooses to look away from those standing on street corners, art can represent people as humans worthy of being admired. The audience takes home a much deeper lesson on the intersection between art, religion and humanity.
A still from “The Oxy Kingpins” (2021).
REVIEW: 'The Oxy Kingpins' mainlines a shot of reality to Cucalorus 2021
Niko Giammanco, Contributing Writer • November 13, 2021
Like a “sit-down” between Big Pharma and “The Godfather,” “The Oxy Kingpins,” a documentary directed by Brendan Fitzgerald (also known for Gaycation) and Nick August-Perna (also known for The Swell Season), delivers an in-your-face take on the hypocrisy of capitalism and its ability to skirt justice for the sake of money, causing the intentional pain of millions of addicted Americans, with no hint of remorse insight.
Katie Boland in “We’re All in This Together” (2021).
REVIEW: ‘We’re All In This Together’ is a remarkable dysfunctional family film
Stephen Lambros, Contributing Writer • November 13, 2021
“We’re All In This Together” signals a promising future for star and filmmaker Boland. With this captivating film, Boland can surely harness her vision for characters and story to move forward in the industry as an actress and a director. All in all, “We’re All In This Together” tells a chaotic, humorous, and earnest tale of the mending of familial bonds and the unyielding devotion coming along beside it.
A still from “Wuhan Wuhan” (2021).
REVIEW: ‘Wuhan Wuhan’ explores a new perspective of the COVID-19 pandemic
Stephen Lambros, Contributing Writer • November 13, 2021
All in all, “Wuhan Wuhan” is a heartfelt and deeply human time capsule that deserves to be seen by many people. The film effectively shows that while the coronavirus affected people on a global scale, the human race is more than capable of overcoming it.
Cucalorus is hosting their 27th annual film festival.
27th Cucalorus Festival kicks off in downtown Wilmington
Grace Hall, Contributing Writer • November 8, 2021
Though this festival is a continuation of an annual tradition, it never fails to introduce some of the up-and-coming names in the film and music industry, bringing light to topics needing representation in media. Whether you are a film geek, a fan of good music, or simply a festival-goer interested in modern media, Cuculorus welcomes all.
UNCW student and lifestyle Youtuber Sophia Pruett. (Courtesy of Sophia Pruett)
Sophia Pruett on her journey on YouTube and in life
Abigail Celoria, Contributing Writer • November 4, 2021
In recent years, YouTube has become an unexpected expert source for students just beginning the college search. Many universities found unofficial spokespeople in YouTube lifestyle vloggers. The popularity of the genre has allowed ordinary college students to take over the online space, posting day-in-my-life vlogs, homework tips and tricks, outfit try-ons and more. For high schoolers looking forward to this new phase of life, these YouTubers provide an inside look into the real college experience. UNCW has its own unofficial representative in Sophia Pruett, a senior who has been documenting her college career since its beginning.
Elliot Stanford plays guitar in the band Ridgewood.
Rock band 'Ridgewood' on being created during the pandemic and musical inspiration
Kiley Woods, Staff Writer • October 27, 2021
Ridgewood started in the midst of a long-term global crisis: a pandemic, the ongoing fight for human rights and general uneasiness. Like many artists during this time of darkness and undesired silence they were driven together by a common goal, to put creativity and art in front of feelings of fear and uncertainty.
Natalie Wandersee also got to visit the Buda Castle in Budapest, Hungary.
Tales from Abroad: Finding yourself in Budapest
Giancarlo Franzese, Contributing Writer • October 7, 2021
Natalie Wandersee, a 21-year-old senior, is studying abroad in Budapest, Hungary until Dec. 23, and focusing on Communication Studies at a Business University called Corvinus. She is taking fun classes including cross-cultural communications and marketing, where Wandersee states she is learning the most in.
Robby Fensom talks about The Paradox of Tar Heel Politics by Rob Christensen.
SGA President Robby Fensom shares what is in his bookbag
Caroline Straubel, Contributing Writer • September 23, 2021

SGA Student Body President Robby Fensom gave The Seahawk a tour of his bookbag for our new series discovering what your fellow students carry...

College Love: Its a Virgo thing
College Love: It's a Virgo thing
June 22, 2021
I thought we’d meet, introduce ourselves and practically never speak much after that. It was only two days into being roommates. I barely knew anything about Leslie except for her natal chart, the direction of her uterus and that she had a UTI.
Netzer on the beach.
Nikki Netzer's balancing act
Brenna Flanagan, Editor-in-Chief • May 17, 2021
Netzer has a penchant for optimism. That positive outlook helps when her job requires her to be online a lot, and it shows on her own social media. Every photo is posed just enough to look off guard, every thread of her messy bun perfectly styled. Despite her projected image, Netzer is thinking more about revealing the uncontrollable—especially now in this time of shared pain.  

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