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The Johnson & Johnson vaccine being administered in the UNCW Burney Center.

OPINION: The fear-driven pause of the Johnson and Johnson vaccine was a costly mistake

Jacob Sawyer, Staff Writer April 24, 2021
Public health authorities in the U.S. have committed a massive blunder by suddenly withholding from a desperate nation a lifesaving vaccine.  Last week, the FDA and CDC recommended a pause of the single-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine following reports of blood clots in women who had just received the inoculation.
Members of the Multi-faith Anti-Racism Change and Healing Group celebrate at 38th and Chicago after the verdict was read in the murder trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, Tuesday, April 20, 2021 in Minneapolis.

OPINION: The Chauvin conviction marks the end of the beginning, not the beginning of the end

Jacob Sawyer, Staff Writer April 24, 2021
Derek Chauvin, the officer who killed Floyd, was found guilty of murder Tuesday and hauled off to prison, possibly for decades. The Black community and its allies joyously poured into America’s streets in celebration, relieved that they can now begin to heal from the trauma of both the killing and trial. Many consider the case a turning point in U.S. policing as well as the country overall, but much more and harder work remains ahead.
Cannabis plant in flowering stage.

Photo by Matthew Sichkaruk on Unsplash

OPINION: Legalizing cannabis just makes economic sense

Nicolas Ziccardi, Assistant Opinion Editor April 22, 2021
While the moral arguments for and against cannabis legalization have been thoroughly played out and exhausted, the fiscal incentives and prerogative to legalize far outweigh any moral hesitations. North Carolina has taken the tax revenues from both alcohol and lottery ticket sales and financed public works projects and programs that make the best of potentially detrimental activities. 
The U.S. Capitol Building, on Saturday, Jan. 16, 2021, in Washington, D.C. 

(Kent Nishimura/TNS)

OPINION: Who is the filibuster for?

Nicolas Ziccardi, Assistant Opinion Editor April 22, 2021
While it is feasible to eliminate the filibuster as it exists now, many senators, including Manchin and other Democrats, are hesitant to destroy what they see as a key tool of the minority party. With Democrats' Senate and House prospects looking mixed going into the 2022 midterm elections, several Democratic senators are worried that Republicans would be able to do much more damage than they did during the Trump administration if the filibuster is removed. 
The Mohnin-Sholz LGBTQ office.

OPINION: For the LGBT community, an Arkansas bill sets a dangerous precedent nationwide

Jacob Sawyer, Staff Writer April 20, 2021

In Arkansas, any transgender resident under the age of 18 is about to be denied the medical care required to help them transition genders. This includes the care required to keep them alive. Yes, you read...

Stained glass in a church.

Photo by Paul Zoetemeijer on Unsplash

OPINION: Physical perfection is ingrained superiority within Christianity’s doctrine of the resurrection

Michael Friant, Contributing Writer April 20, 2021

Millions of people globally are born each year with unique traits and characteristics. Some of these characteristics are so ingrained into the existence of these individuals that suddenly taking them away,...

OPINION: SGA needs to reform its campaign process

OPINION: SGA needs to reform its campaign process

Nicolas Ziccardi, Assistant Opinion Editor April 20, 2021

The Student Government Association (SGA) announced its 2021-2022 winners for student body president and vice president following the first run-off in 15 years. Robby Fensom and Thomas Wilson won a tight...

Asylum-seekers who crossed the U.S.-Mexico border illegally wait to be processed in Mission, Texas.

OPINION: Who is really behind the border crisis? (Hint: it is not Biden or Trump)

Jacob Sawyer, Staff Writer April 8, 2021
It is true that since Biden took office, the number of apprehensions of migrants entering the U.S. from the southern border surged after he promised in his campaign to enact more liberal immigration policies. It is also true that Trump’s directives were extremely controversial and sometimes in violation of human rights, which Biden harped on during his campaign. 
The amphitheater.

OPINION: In addition to easing debt, raise the minimum wage for students

Jacob Sawyer, Staff Writer April 5, 2021

The COVID-19 pandemic and the draconian curbs required to stop the spread have wrought economic devastation across the U.S. on a scale not witnessed since the Great Depression. Many businesses have been...

Young teen doing schoolwork at home after schools close due to the Coronavirus.

How Zoom classes affect our quality of life

Nicolas Ziccardi, Assistant Opinion Editor March 28, 2021

During the pandemic, many college students have had the luxury of continuing their education through safe and effective means with the proliferation of Zoom learning, which partially or fully replaced...

OPINION: Life with cerebral palsy

OPINION: Life with cerebral palsy

Michael Friant, Contributing Writer March 25, 2021
March 25 is Cerebral Palsy awareness day.
President Trump and his allies were livid when Twitter exercised its commercial prerogative and banned him.

OPINION: The end of Trump’s ‘fireside chats’

Anthony Culler, Contributing Writer March 24, 2021
FDR, a Democrat, faced an adversarial force in the dominant press of the day—newspapers—the majority of which were conservative. This is in stark contrast to today’s press which most will agree is more left-leaning than the right-leaning newspapers of the 1930s. And while FDR had major resistance from the newspapers, he found solace in his radio broadcasts. You could consider it, in today’s terms, his very own social media venue. If you compare the use of Twitter by Trump during his presidency, you will see a similarity in FDR's use of radio.
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