The Seahawk

Former recon Marine swims at Wrightsville Beach to raise money for veterans struggling with addiction

Former recon Marine swims at Wrightsville Beach to raise money for veterans struggling with addiction

Olivia Vizethann, Staff Writer April 30, 2022
With no wetsuit, Nelson completed the swim against 12 mph winds, an incoming tide and 66 F ocean water with a total time of seven hours and four minutes. Wetsuits not only serve as a tool to warm the body in cold water temperatures, but also add a small amount of buoyancy which can greatly assist in open water swimming. All of these factors on top of the great distance Nelson covered in the water is hard to fathom, but Nelson simply said, “A recon Marine would rather die than quit.”
The area around New Hanover library in downtown Wilmington is common place to see the magnitude of homelessness around the city.

Wilmington struggles to combat homelessness

Hannah Markov, Opinion Editor April 8, 2022
An ordinance was proposed in New Hanover County last month that aimed to deter homeless people from camping out on county property, including the Wilmington Public Library downtown. Sleeping would have been prohibited between 10 p.m. and 7 a.m., and items left for more than two hours would be discarded. The ordinance initially included a $50 fine for violations, but this was soon removed. Violators of the ordinance could have been removed by law enforcement and prosecuted for trespassing, although government officials did state that this would be used as a “last resort.”
Sunset View of Washington, DC.

U.S. House race back on track in North Carolina after redistricting crisis

Kiley Woods, Photography Editor March 22, 2022
This year's midterm election carries uneasiness and uncertainty for future control in the House of Representatives. All 435 House seats are open for this year’s election, with each party seeking the needed 218 seats to gain a House majority. Recent redistricting controversies in the state have complicated the election even more.
Town Hall in Downtown Wilmington.

Wilmington’s city council discusses ratification of the ERA in North Carolina

Abigail Celoria, Assistant Culture Editor January 28, 2022
On Jan. 18, the Wilmington City Council unanimously passed the resolution calling for the ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment with seven “yea” votes from Mayor Pro Tem Magaret Haynes, Mayor Bill Saffo, and Councilmembers Charlie Rivenbark, Clifford Barnett, Kevin Spears, Luke Waddell and Neil Anderson. The city’s resolution is part of a growing movement across North Carolina petitioning the General Assembly to ratify the amendment. This proposed amendment to the Constitution would become the 28th if ratified and calls for the legal guarantee of equal rights for all American citizens regardless of sex. Almost 50 years since its first proposal to state legislatures in 1972, it is again receiving attention as states appeal for Congress to remove the initial ratification deadline.
U.S. Rep. Joe Wilson speaks at an early morning campaign event with Lindsey Graham on Monday, Nov. 2, 2020 in Lexington, South Carolina. (Tracy Glantz/The State/TNS)

Everything you need to know about North Carolina’s U.S. Senate race

Kiley Woods and Brenna Flanagan January 25, 2022
There is a lot of uneasiness in anticipation of this year’s midterm elections. One of the key races to determine the makeup of the nation’s Senate will be right here in North Carolina. Senator Richard Burr is not running for reelection, which leaves an empty seat that many North Carolina Republicans and Democrats are fighting to fill. Since the Senate is split 50-50 between both parties (two Independents caucusing with Democrats), every seat counts in this election. Without a clear predecessor to Burr, North Carolina might become a pivotal state in November’s vote.
The bridge in the distance on the Cape Fear river.

After 40 years of contamination, lawsuit to save the Cape Fear?

Kiley Woods, Staff Writer December 16, 2021
The deal reached between Cape Fear River Watch, The Department of Environmental Quality and Chemours was finalized in 2020. The plan was written by The Chemours Company and was edited and revised to take immediate and sustainable action against contamination. The deal addressed the contamination of the river and Chemours responsibility for contaminating the groundwater. The plan will outline specific goals and deadlines for Chemours to install additional filtration systems and treat the groundwater and surface water in order to eventually remove 99% of PFAS.
The riverwalk in Wilmington N.C.

Funding for the Wilmington film workforce initiative will spark growth for the industry

Boyce Rucker, Intern October 23, 2021
Wilmington is ripe with countless opportunities at the moment for film studies students and graduates to become involved with the town’s productions. North Carolina is on track to exceed a $400 million production value in what many people are considering to be one of the state's most successful years for film in quite some time.
Students head to class.

BOG discusses COVID-19 and budget effects on UNC students

Chamiya Campbell, News Editor September 23, 2021
On Sept. 15 and 16, the Board of Governors for the University of North Carolina school systems met to discuss COVID-19 protocols and their effects on budgets. Key points of focus from the meeting were the continuation of lessening COVID-19 restrictions, as well as a potential budget increase that will be discussed and voted on Nov. 17 and 18. Both topics will have immense effects on students of UNC institutions.
A closeup of a gavel in court.

Criminal Justice Reform Bill looks to hold those in law enforcement accountable

Grace Hall, Contributing Writer September 12, 2021
For those victims of police violence, Senate Bill 300 seems to be the light at the end of a tunnel. Finally, action is backing words, and seems to herald a new age in which law enforcement officers will be held to a higher standard, and more importantly, will be held accountable for their actions. While many in the police force aim to protect the American people at any cost, for those that go overboard and begin resorting to violence, it could be their new reckoning.
North Carolina Rep. Madison Cawthorn and Indiana Rep. Jim Banks chat before former U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo introduces the Maximum Pressure Act against Iran on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday, April 21, 2021.

OPINION: Madison Cawthorn should be doing more to help the disabled community

Michael Friant, Contributing Writer August 5, 2021
Cawthorn should be using his platform to amplify that people with disabilities are in fact normal. He could do this in a variety of ways. First, he could talk about his own experiences as a person with a wheelchair. Undoubtedly, he has had these experiences and they have played a huge role in his life. Second, he could start weekly conversations with other people with disabilities in North Carolina which would not only amplify the disability community but also enlighten him as a representative of the people.
Democratic candidate Jeff Jackson is running for U.S. Senate.

Here are North Carolina’s candidates running for the Senate in 2022

Brenna Flanagan , Editor-in-Chief July 15, 2021

Since incumbent Senator Richard Burr announced he would not seek re-election in 2022, many North Carolinians have expressed interest in taking his place. The federal government already operates...

The Emmett Till statue is seen through protesters at the South Carolina State House in Columbia, South Carolina demonstrating their anger over racial injustice on June 5, 2020.

Critical race theory and how it is affecting Wilmington

Andrew Lemon and Brenna Flanagan July 11, 2021

Over the past year, a new term has entered the political lexicon in the United States. Critical race theory, an theory in legal academia analyzing race as it relates to the framework of society, has taken...

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